Tag Archives: Awareness

Story Of The Day: Gratitude, Ninjas & Elderberries

At Soaring Eagle Nature School, parents receive a Story Of The Day email to learn about what the kids got up to in the program. Here’s a Story Of The Day from a Young Sprouts program instructed by Jenna and Cara this month:

Hello SENS Families!
 
Yesterday we were met with grey clouds and pending rain, and into the forest we went!
 
We started out playing Wolves and Ravens. The Ravens tried to steal food from the Wolves, who had just gotten a fresh kill. When the Ravens were caught by the Wolves, the Animal Rescuers came and saved them. We learned that the Ravens have to be persistent and try and grab food from the Wolves as often as they can.
 
We shared our gratitudes for the day and then during snack, Cara told a wonderful story about a Weaver bird named Baya. They are the only bird that know how to tie a half hitch! Its the first knot they do to start the building of their nest. The story was about Baya, who grew up in a community of weaver birds, and rather than go to the daily lessons on knot tying and nest building, he napped, or explored instead. When it was time for him to start building his nest and think about a mate, he slacked off and didn’t worry. He told everyone he could build his nest in an hour! When he finally decided to try, he couldn’t pick the right kind of grass. Then he got his wing tied up in his knot, and then his foot! Finally, he realized he would need help, and that he should have listened to his elders. He was lucky, and was visited by an elder bird, who helped him learn how to tie the half hitch, and start his nest.
 
After,  it was time for some Ninja training. We warmed our bodies and practiced our stealth by following each other as a group, over the hill and back down, and then back over and around.

Beautiful Elderberry beads freshly made

Once we were warm, we started making some beads out of dead Red Elderberry that we had harvested along the trail. First, you push the inner pith out from the centre, and then use a rock to scrape off the bark. Then, using sandpaper you clean the outside and smooth it out and also the inside. we all made several beads and then got some string to use for making a necklace or bracelet. Cara showed us all how to tie a half hitch, just like the Weaver Bird. We all made them for gifts for people we love.
 
We ate out lunch to warm up our bodies and then headed off. At another spot, we played Warrior Stalk, where we had only a few seconds to run towards Cara before we hide to hide again. Getting closer and closer, we could eventually tag her and then make it back to our starting spot, with only 7-10 second intervals. It was hard, but we are all getting better and better at hiding and sneaking!
 
Then it was time to head back, so we re-traced our footsteps, with our beads in our pockets and found all of you.
 
Thanks for a wonderful day!
 
Jenna and Cara

Bird Language With Tully The Cat

Bird language is the ability to read into the communication network of wild animals.

Whenever an animal moves out in nature, the birds are watching and they will give off calls that let other animals know what is happening.

Its a lot like those motion detectors people put outside their homes for security.

The motion detector has sensitive equipment that detects the movement of people moving in close to your house.

When the sensor catches movement it switches on a light which lets everyone who is paying attention know that something is moving in that spot.

When you practice the language of the birds, you’ll learn to detect the signs that animals are moving in forest around you.

Concentric rings

When you stretch your awareness with bird language, you’ll start to notice patterns in bird behavior that let you know when certain events are happening in the landscape.

If an animal is moving in the forest, It’s like dropping a stone into a still pond.  Rings of water emanate in waves from the center of the disturbance.

By observing closely for how the waves of activity are expressed by different birds. you can track how these concentric rings move through the landscape via bird vocalizations.

All you have to do is find the center from which the activity emanates in order to find the animal that is causing the alarm.

With enough listening and observation, you can learn to read the concentric rings that tell you exactly where an animal is and what kind of animal it is.

Bird Language with Tully

After I had been studying the language of the birds for a while and I had started to pick up on certain vocalizations that the birds make when there are animals nearby. I wanted to test my skills as a hunter.

I was living at a house in the country and one of my housemates had a cat named Tully.

I noticed that when Tully was outside the birds acted differently than when he was inside. Their behavior changed incrementally depending on how close by he was.

I would practice using bird language as the traditional hunters would have by trying to sneak up on Tully without him noticing.

Sometimes I was successful and got quite close before I heard his characteristic “meow!” that would let me know I had been caught.

An Ancient Skill

The language of the birds is very subtle.  It’s a kind of awareness that was traditionally quite deeply ingrained in the culture of nature-based people.

People who have a deep awareness of nature and knowledge of place usually didn’t get this ability from consciously trying to learn it.  It’s the result of an unconsciously ingrained awareness.

There are ways to cultivate this awareness more intentionally if you don’t have a culture surrounding you that already has this skill.

The most important factor that determines how well you get this skill comes down to the amount of sit spot time you have.

The quality of your awareness in one place that you visit regularly to connect with nature and make observations eventually turns into the ability to perceive the concentric rings on the landscape.

It’s a fascinating process.